New Blog Site Notification

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Hi all,

I hope you are having a fabulous holiday season!

I have created a new blog/website over at https://susanbrookswriter.com/ where The Writer’s Bag of Tricks will be posted. All the historical posts are there as well. I will continue to post to this site for limited time, but eventually this post site will go away.

If you would be so kind, please visit the new site and sign up for the blog posts.

Best,

Susan (whose goal is to simplify her life!)

 

 

Writer’s Block

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November is National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), and given the number of people participating, and the number of complaints about low word counts or zero word counts, I thought we should chat about writer’s block.

What is writer’s block?

If you look on Wikipedia, writer’s block is a “condition.”

Writer’s block is a condition, primarily associated with writing, in which an author loses the ability to produce new work, or experiences a creative slowdown. The condition ranges in difficulty from coming up with original ideas to being unable to produce a work for years. Throughout history, writer’s block has been a documented problem.

Some people believe it’s an actual thing that happens to people.

For the sake of transparency, I’m in the camp that believes writer’s block is not an actual thing. It’s an excuse.

Let’s look at some of the problems and solutions for having writer’s block.

The Problem: I have been working diligently on my story for a month, and now, suddenly, nothing comes. I just stare at my computer screen.

The Real Problem: This writer doesn’t know where their story is going. They didn’t plan or outline their plot, and so doesn’t know what comes next or how to solve the problem they have written themselves into.

The Solution: Sit your butt in your chair and take an hour, or two, or day, or two, and outline your story so you know what has happened with your plot, where you are currently in your story, and figure out where you need to go to get to the end. Hint: Having an outline, no matter how brief, will help you stay on track. Then write it.

The Problem: I just don’t have any ideas of what to write about.

The Real Problem: This writer wants some kind of magical experience. They are waiting for the muse, and because the muse is on vacation, they don’t know what to write about.

The Solution: Sit your butt in your chair and just write about something. Practice writing. Write about your breakfast. Hint: Writing is five percent inspiration and ninety-five percent doing the consistent work of writing.

The Problem: Pick any excuse for not writing.

The Solution: Sit your butt in your chair and write. Hint: Remember Newton’s Law: objects in motion tend to stay in motion. In other words, it is easier to write consistently if you are dedicated to writing consistently.

Next time: TBD

Anatomy of a Scene

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The Final Scene

We’ve been writing off and on (mostly on) about using scenes to write novels, and the kinds of scenes to think about, since (I had to look it up) July of 2016. It feels like we’ve been focused specifically on scenes for a long, long time. But this is it. This is the last installment. This is the Final Scene.

Your book is done, finished, -30-.

What is the final scene? It’s the end for your protagonist. Your character is probably not dead and doesn’t die in this scene, but this scene is the conclusion of every earlier scene in your book. It should be satisfying for your reader to get to this scene, read it, and close the book. But your ending should be memorable so your character can live on in your reader’s mind.

The final scene can also be a sort of rebirth for your character. But it should:

  • Show your reader where your character is after the climax
  • Allow your character to reflect on the plot
  • Bring your reader full-circle back to where your story started.

In this final scene, you will need to show your character as transformed. They should be a different person from who they were in your opening scene. Showing this transformation will help your reader to feel that the story was fulfilling. Note that there are occasions where the character doesn’t transform, but this transformation will apply to most protagonists.

The final scene should show the consequences of the main actions and decisions of your character. Let your character reflect on what they have learned, and how the world has changed. If your story was a mystery, the mystery has been solved. If your story was a thriller, the bad guy has been thwarted and the world saved. If your story was a romance, then you heroine will live happily ever after with the partner of her choice.

Make the final sentences in your final scene evoke the scent that wafted through your story. Leave your reader with a visual image of the book’s premise. If you book is a sequel, the final sentence could hint at the next adventure, but if it does that be careful that it isn’t a cliffhanger. The final scene is not about cliffhangers. It’s about resolution.

After you work on the perfect final scene, with a satisfying ending and visual image that’s it. You’re done. Write The End and put the book away in a file. In three months pull it out and read it. No edits. No tweaks. Just read it. Out loud. And be proud of yourself.

Next time: I don’t know yet. Shoot me a message at oosuzieq AT Gmail DOT com if there is a particular topic or series that you’d like me to write about.

 

It’s Time for the Climax

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The climax scene, that is. We’ve been thinking about scenes, and writing our novels in scenes, for some time as a way to improve all aspects of our books, and this week we will focus on the highest point of action and drama. First off, the climactic scene is the final turning point of action …

The Epiphany Scene

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Epiphany scenes are one of my favorites. I love learning new and transformative information as a reader. What is an epiphany? An epiphany is a sudden, intuitive perception of insight into the reality or essential meaning of something, usually initiated by some simple common place occurrence or experience. Sounds simple? Think of it this way. …

Flashback Scenes

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Admittedly, I am not a fan of the flashback scene, generally, because these tend to be written poorly and (mostly because I am in a snarky mood), end up being a huge information dump of weighed down cumbersome luggage. They wallow in or lean toward boring, and usually, the information contained in a flashback scene …