David S. Atkinson is the author of “Apocalypse All the Time,” “Not Quite so Stories” (2016 Best Book Awards Finalist Fiction: Short Story), “The Garden of Good and Evil Pancakes” (2015 National Indie Excellence Awards finalist in humor), and “Bones Buried in the Dirt” (2014 Next Generation Indie Book Awards finalist, First Novel <80K). He is a Staff Reader for Digging Through The Fat and his writing appears in “Bartleby Snopes,” “Literary Orphans,” “Atticus Review,” and others. His writing website is http://davidsatkinsonwriting.com/.

The Garden of Good and Evil Pancakes

Don’t you hate it when you may (or may not) be trapped endlessly in a Village Inn with your ex-boyfriend and his new girlfriend, coincidentally your ex-best friend? That’s the kind of day Cassandra is having. In a homogenized world that is left mostly empty so everyone can feel comfortable, The Garden of Good and Evil Pancakes explores the fictions we tell ourselves and the fictions we tell ourselves about the fictions we tell ourselves.

Roses Are Red, Violets Are Stealing Loose Change From My Pockets While I Sleep

In his previous collection, Not Quite So Stories, David S. Atkinson twisted reality with small absurdities. Roses are Red, Violets are Stealing Loose Change from my Pockets While I Sleep leaves sanity completely behind, pondering modern life through surreal humorous flash fiction involving Margaret Thatcher, jam appearing in boxers overnight, Gene Roddenberry, and more.

Not Quite So Stories

Not Quite So Stories showcases the idea that life is absurd, ultimately beyond comprehension. In each story, people try to understand and explain the world. They may be able to come to terms with small pieces, but existence as a whole is beyond their grasp. Life isn’t explainable, and the best people can do is continue on with their lives in the face of that fact. The stories in this collection proceed from this idea, examining how different characters manage – and/or fail – to do this.

Apocalypse All the Time

Apocalypse All the Time is post-post-apocalypticism. The apocalypse happens on a weekly (if not daily) basis and Marshall is sick of it. Life is constantly in peril, constantly disrupted, but nothing significant every really happens as a result. It’s always handled. Marshall wants out; he wants it all to end. In short, the book explores what about the end times holds such fascination for humanity and what impact such a fascination has on the way we live our lives.

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